Badiou and Hegel: Infinity, Dialectics, Subjectivity by Jim Vernon and Antonio Calcagno

DOWNLOAD "Badiou and Hegel: Infinity, Dialectics, Subjectivity offers critical appraisals of two of the dominant figures of the Continental tradition of philosophy, Alain Badiou and G.W.F. Hegel. Jim Vernon and Antonio Calcagno bring together established and emerging authors in Continental philosophy to discuss the relationship between the thinkers, creating a multifarious collection of essays by... Continue Reading →

Philosophy Beyond Nihilism

| Listen to Article Here | PDF | YouTube | Why has there never been a noumenology but ever a phenomenology within the philosophical field, and what if this doesn't mean that there never will be one? There is indeed a spectre haunting our world, as Karl Marx has once put it... It's the spectre... Continue Reading →

Time and Capital: How to Think and Act in a Post-Catastrophic World (Audio/Visual)

Article Here

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Three Modalities of the Immanent Infinity: Life, Matter, and Thought in Henry, Deleuze, and Badiou (Audio Essay)

Full Text by Cengiz Erdem Here

Ölümlü, Pek Ölümlü: Kitab-ı Nihil ve Postnihilistik Spekülasyonlar

Zamanın uçurumundan ve ötesindeki karanlıktan başka ne görüyorsunuz? - William Shakespeare Kanlı bir yumurta sarısı. Bir çarşafa yayılan yanmış bir delik. Herkesi açmakla tehdit eden öfkeli bir gül. - May Svvenson Dipsiz bir uçurumun içine baktığınız zaman, o da sizin içinize bakar. - Friedrich Nietzsche Baktıkça bakıyorsunuz kendinize, Yetişir! Bu da hiç konuşmayan adam yapıyor... Continue Reading →

The Time of Trauma and the Immanence of Eternity (Audio Essay)

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Badiou on Kant and Hegel

There are two main philosophical targets of Badiou as he puts in The Subject of Art:[4] Those who identify the body and the subject, in which case creativity can only take the form of experimentation with the limits of the body, an experience of the finitude and complete unity of the body. Death being the limit... Continue Reading →

Alain Badiou: The Age of the Poets

To celebrate National Poetry Day in the UK, we present an extract from Alain Badiou‘s illuminating work revisiting the age-old problem of the relation between literature and philosophy, The Age of the Poets, looking at literature’s unique position between science and ideology. Badiou proposes the essential link between poetry and communism in the twentieth century, through the common good of language, and gives reason to both the writing and reading of poetry in a time of revolution.

Poetry and Communism

Alain Badiou / 06 October 2016 / Verso

In the last century, some truly great poets, in almost all languages on earth, have been communists. In an explicit or formal way, for example, the following poets were committed to communism: in Turkey, Nâzim Hikmet; in Chile, Pablo Neruda; in Spain, Rafael Alberti; in Italy, Edoardo Sanguineti; in Greece, Yannis Ritsos; in China, Ai Qing; in Palestine, Mahmoud Darwish; in Peru, César Vallejo; and in Germany, the shining example is above all Bertolt Brecht. But we could cite a very large number of other names in other languages, throughout the world.

Can we understand this link between poetic commitment and communist commitment as a simple illusion? An error, or an errancy? An ignorance of the ferocity of states ruled by communist parties? I do not believe so. I wish to argue, on the contrary, that there exists an essential link between poetry and communism, if we understand ‘communism’ closely in its primary sense: the concern for what is common to all. A tense, paradoxical, violent love of life in common; the desire that what ought to be common and accessible to all should not be appropriated by the servants of Capital. The poetic desire that the things of life would be like the sky and the earth, like the water of the oceans and the brush res on a summer night – that is to say, would belong by right to the whole world.

Poets are communist for a primary reason, which is absolutely essential: their domain is language, most often their native tongue. Now, language is what is given to all from birth as an absolutely common good. Poets are those who try to make a language say what it seems incapable of saying. Poets are those who seek to create in language new names to name that which, before the poem, has no name. And it is essential for poetry that these inventions, these creations, which are internal to language, have the same destiny as the mother tongue itself: for them to be given to all without exception. The poem is a gift of the poet to language. But this gift, like language itself, is destined to the common – that is, to this anonymous point where what matters is not one person in particular but all, in the singular.

Thus, the great poets of the twentieth century recognized in the grandiose revolutionary project of communism something that was familiar to them – namely that, as the poem gives its inventions to language and as language is given to all, the material world and the world of thought must be given integrally to all, becoming no longer the property of a few but the common good of humanity as a whole.

That is why one moment – a singular historic moment – has been sung by all the communist poets who wrote between the 1920s and 1940s: the moment of the civil war in Spain, which as you know ran from 1936 to 1939.


By PICASSO, la exposición del Reina-Prado. Guernica is in the collection of Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid. Source

Let us observe that the Spanish civil war is certainly the historic event that has most intensely mobilized all the artists and intellectuals of the world. On one hand, the personal commitment of writers from all ideological tendencies on the side of the republicans, including therefore the communists, is remarkable: whether we are dealing with organized communists, social democrats, mere liberals, or even fervent Catholics, such as the French writer Georges Bernanos, the list is extraordinary if we gather all those who publicly spoke out, who went to Spain in the midst of the war, or even entered into combat on the side of the republican forces. On the other hand, the number of masterpieces produced on this occasion is no less astonishing. I have already noted as much for poetry. But let us also think of the splendid painting by Pablo Picasso that is titled Guernica; let us think of two of the greatest novels in their genre: Man’s Hope by André Malraux and For Whom the Bell Tolls by the American Ernest Hemingway. The frightening and bloody civil war in Spain has illuminated the art of the world for several years.

Finish the chapter, and read more, in The Age of the Poets

Further reading:
César Vallejo’s 
‘Hymn to the Volunteers of the Republic’
Pablo Neruda’s ‘Arrival in Madrid of the International Brigade’
Works by Nâzim Hikmet and Bertolt Brecht

Full book as PDF here

SubSense

The full book here.

“If the factory oscillates between pre-inscription and the unsayable, this is because it is caught in the trappings of its function as a machine and subtracted from its true essence, which is to be a political place, a production of truths.” – Alain Badiou

via A Requiem for the Factory — New Poetics of Labor

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Ebediyet Edebiyatından Aşkın Ölümsüz Öznesine Bazı Aşkınsal Ahkâmlar

2007 yılında Pier Paolo Pasolini üzerine verdiği Yıkım, Olumsuzlama, Çıkarma (Destruction, Negation, Subtraction) adlı bir seminerde direnmenin, isyan etmenin elbette ki en doğal hak olduğunu söyleyen, fakat direnişin farklı formlarda tezahür eden bir yapıya sahip olması sebebiyle dikkat edilmesi gereken bazı hususlar bulunduğunun da altını çizen Alain Badiou‘nun amacı, olumsuzlamanın değil, olumlamanın önce geldiği bir... Continue Reading →

Kantian Reflections on Science, Metaphysics, and the Future of Time: Situating Kant’s Spatio-Temporal Modalities of Being and Thought in Contemporary Philosophy and Neuroscience

Inferential Rationality Kant’s initial project was to explicate the difference between “knowing-what” (pure reason) and “knowing-how” (practical reason) in the way of laying the foundations of a scientific metaphysics. Counter to Descartes[1] and Hume[2] he aimed at situating the subject within the limits of what can be known by rational human beings. The Kantian subject... Continue Reading →

Badiou: Down with Death!

Alain Badiou Let’s start from the notion of nihilism. What does it mean? Nihilism is a figuration, a diagnostic on the state of the world and of thought, which established itself in the nineteenth century (we could argue that in a certain sense the first nihilist philosophy was Schopenhauer’s) on the ruins of the old... Continue Reading →

The Three Modalities of Immanent Infinity: Life, Matter and Thought in Henry, Deleuze and Badiou

| Download as PDF || Click Here to Listen | Recommended Voice: Amy (English – GB) Abstract In this essay I attempt to explicate the sense in which Michel Henry’s reductive phenomenology rendering Life as affectivity resonates with Alain Badiou’s subtractive ontology rendering the subject as eternity in time. I claim that these two modes of subjectivity... Continue Reading →

Identity and Universality + Radical Grace by Alain Badiou (Video)

Being, Non-Being and Becoming Non-Identical of the Subject as ∅

If the one is not, nothing is. ~ Parmenides In a recent article citing my Postnihilistic Speculations on That Which Is Not: A Thought-World According to an Ontology of Non-Being, the giant of philosophical blogosphere and my fellow para-academic colleague S.C. Hickman has succintly outlined the roots of contemporary ontology. Drawing upon Parmenides, Plato, Meillassoux, Žižek and... Continue Reading →

Hermetico-Promethean Postnihilism

  To begin at the beginning we shall say that philosophy is the dialectical process of truth in time, it is an infinite questioning of that which is known, a continuity in change of the unknown, a practice of situating eternity in time. Without a relation to the requirements of one's own time philosophy may... Continue Reading →

The Future History of a Non-Reductive Philosophical Agenda

Situating Neuroscience in the Context of Transcendental Realism/Materialism and Non-Reductive Naturalism Inferential Rationality The question I had in mind as I was in search of funding for a research project that would enable me to write “a book comparing the ontological and the epistemological modes of being and thinking in and through which the subject... Continue Reading →

Alain Badiou delivers the 11 points inspired by the situation in Greece

 It is urgently necessary to internationalise the Greek people’s cause. Only the total elimination of the debt would bring an "ideological blow" to the current European system. 1. The Greek people’s massive "No" does not mean a rejection of Europe. It means a rejection of the bankers’ Europe, of infinite debt and of globalised capitalism.... Continue Reading →

A letter from Badiou to Deleuze on Heidegger (July 1994)

I would like to resume, today, the parallel between you and Heidegger that I was sketching in my last letter. 1) A crucial difference seems to count against the comparison. In your work there is no “historial” set up, of the type “history of the forgetting of being”, “decline”, etc. As you say, you are... Continue Reading →

Postnihilistic Speculations on That Which Is Not: A Thought-World According to an Ontology of Non-Being

When everything appears similar, nothing really is... ~ Alain Badiou Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn’t go away...  ~ Philip K. Dick It is easier to imagine the end of the world than it is to imagine the end of capitalism... ~ Fredric Jameson If you are trapped within the dream... Continue Reading →

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