Thinking the uncommon

In one of the most interesting post I have encountered recently in the blogosphere - Object-Oriented Psychoanalysis and Derridean Deconstruction - Cengiz Erdem argues that the common things of everyday existence are produced out of the depressive position or abnormalities. As the author comments, psychic development is complemented by the death drive. Whereas this relationship is... Continue Reading →


Object-Oriented Psychoanalysis and Derridean Deconstruction (#Derridagate)

According to Melanie Klein we all oscillate between the paranoid-schizoid position and the depressive position throughout our lives. This means that none is normal since the world is a place in which all kinds of abnormalities take place all the time and nobody can be a normal person independently of all these abnormalities. One may... Continue Reading →

Simon Critchley – To Philosophize Is to Learn How to Die (Video) + Creatureliness and Immortality + Method and Consequences of The Life Death Drives

Creatureliness and Immortality (via Speculative Humbug)  [I now think the opinions expressed here are massively too hasty - this issue of meaning and finitude requires a lot more thought - but I'll leave the original post up anyway.] I've just watched the first episode of this interview with Simon Critchley, and I thought I'd take... Continue Reading →

“Derrida” The Movie

"Derrida" The Movie différance “For Derrida, being is the oppositional conflict between binaries, but what is more real than even this duel of forces is the difference between them… But Derrida shows through his elaboration of différance that neither term in the binary truly conquers the other because both need the other in order to... Continue Reading →

The Method and Consequences of The Life Death Drives

If one reads the writings on film and literature in this thesis with the conscious naivety of their plot based critique in mind, one can sense the underlying current of humour and the erratic undertone of irony, both of which knock down the serious tone of the critique based on a linear reproduction of a circular plot – as we see in the investigation of David Lynch’s Mulholland Drive for instance.

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